130-year-old gasholder building on national historic list

CONCORD, N.H. — A 130-year-old red-brick coal gasholder building in New Hampshire believed to be the last of its type in the country has been named to the National Register of Historic Places.

The round building with a cupola atop its conical roof was built in Concord in 1888 when coal gas was a major source of light and heat. It was last used in 1953, but its original equipment remains.

The New Hampshire Division of Historical Resources announced the listing Monday.

The gasholder worked this way: Coal gas was pumped into a wrought-iron, 120,000 cubic foot tank that floated atop water. The tank rose and fell based on how much gas was present. The tank's weight provided constant pressure to force the gas out through pipes, where it was distributed to the public.

More Travel News

Portions of Yellowstone River, some tributaries re-opened

Sep 1, 2016

Montana has re-opened portions of the Yellowstone River, but it is keeping a popular stretch closed due to a fish-killing parasite

New air links raise hopes in Washington and Cuba

Sep 4, 2016

By December some 300 direct flights a week from the U.S. will land in 10 cities across Cuba, and Washington hopes the planes will carry hundreds of thousands of travelers, turning the long-isolated island back into a major American vacation destination

Turkey hopeful on EU visa-free deal for citizens

Sep 9, 2016

Turkey's foreign minister says he believes Turkey and the European Union can come to an agreement on granting visa-free travel for Turks

To travel is to live. Unearth your next travel destination here with The Travel Trooper. We love what we do and looking forward to more #travelsquad joining us in this journey.

Contact us: sales@thetraveltrooper.com